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Topic Subject:The Quick Question Thread
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Legio Yow
Legionary
posted 23 January 2007 09:42 EDT (US)         
I decided we needed one of these.

The purpose of this thread is for little questions that have objective answers, and don't merit their own thread. For example, a good question you might ask here is "Who was the emperor who built the Colosseum?" or "Where can I find a description of the Battle of Alesia?". You can also use this if you are having trouble finding previous discussions in this forum. For example, you might ask "Where can I find a detailed description of the mechanics of a corpse bridge?", which would receive an answer.

This thread is not for introducing discussion topics. You do not ask "So, who was better. Genghis Khan or Alexander the Great?". Think of it as the AH equivalent of the Roman Party thread but do not spam.

If your query starts to get replies beyond two or three posts, then consider starting a specific thread if it looks set to run. If it gets to six or seven posts, start a specific thread on it.

This forum has needed this for a while. Please obey the rules.


"That which we call a nose can still smell!"
-Reduced Shakespeare Company

"Abroad, French transit workers attempt to end a strike, only to discover that they have forgotten how to operate the trains. Everybody enjoys a hearty laugh and returns to the café." -Dave Barry

[This message has been edited by Legio Yow (edited 01-23-2007 @ 05:15 PM).]

AuthorReplies:
Rex84
Legionary
posted 18 February 2009 20:11 EDT (US)     176 / 188       
On the topic of historical fiction, Ross Leckie wrote a pretty good one called "Hannibal."
It takes some getting used to because it's written in the first person, but worth a read.

"Cowardice and stupidity are vices which,
disgraceful as they are in private to those who have them,
are when found in a general the greatest of public calamities."

- Polybius of Megalopolis
MisplacedPope
Legionary
(id: misplacedgeneral)
posted 18 February 2009 20:14 EDT (US)     177 / 188       
What is it about? My two favorite historical fictions are written in the first person (To two above-mentioned, I, Claudius and Name of the Rose) but in a manner of looking back at events that had already occurred. Is it similar in style?

Edit: On the topic, another favorite of mine is Last of the Mohicans. Ironically, all three of those named have excellent films TV series based on them (Though I have not seen the whole series for I, Claudius, from what I have seen and heard it is extraordinarily well acted).

"It's not true. Some have great stories, pretty stories that take place at lakes with boats and friends and noodle salad. Just no one in this car. But, a lot of people, that's their story. Good times, noodle salad. What makes it so hard is not that you had it bad, but that you're that pissed that so many others had it good." Jack Nicholson

[This message has been edited by MisplacedPope (edited 02-18-2009 @ 08:16 PM).]

Rex84
Legionary
posted 18 February 2009 20:24 EDT (US)     178 / 188       
Hannibal is basically a fictional memoir... it's Hannibal, as an old man in Asia Minor about to kill himself, retelling the story of his life as he is about to die, sort of like one big diary entry.
Ross Leckie knows a lot about that era, so there are a lot of interesting details.
Apparently Vin Diesel is using it as the screenplay for the Second Punic War movie he's making, so hopefully that will be good.

"Cowardice and stupidity are vices which,
disgraceful as they are in private to those who have them,
are when found in a general the greatest of public calamities."

- Polybius of Megalopolis
MisplacedPope
Legionary
(id: misplacedgeneral)
posted 18 February 2009 20:30 EDT (US)     179 / 188       
Ah, so it is pretty much Hannibal's "I, Claudius"

If you enjoyed the style, read Grave's work, absolutely wonderful.

If I remember to do so, next time I order some books I'll check out the prices on Hannibal.

"It's not true. Some have great stories, pretty stories that take place at lakes with boats and friends and noodle salad. Just no one in this car. But, a lot of people, that's their story. Good times, noodle salad. What makes it so hard is not that you had it bad, but that you're that pissed that so many others had it good." Jack Nicholson
Rex84
Legionary
posted 18 February 2009 20:36 EDT (US)     180 / 188       
Yeah, I'll check out 'I Claudius' too... one of my friends has it and said it's definitely worth reading.

While we're on this topic... has anyone here read Gore Vidal's "Creation"?

One other thing... Kor, who is that guy in your avatar? I know I've seen him before, and it's driving me nuts trying to figure out who it is.

"Cowardice and stupidity are vices which,
disgraceful as they are in private to those who have them,
are when found in a general the greatest of public calamities."

- Polybius of Megalopolis

[This message has been edited by Rex84 (edited 02-18-2009 @ 08:40 PM).]

Kor
Busschof Happertesch
(id: Derfel Cadarn)
posted 19 February 2009 01:18 EDT (US)     181 / 188       
It's Frederick Barbarossa, as drawn in the Welfenchronik (full image here. It's quite well known and I recently discovered it's also used on the Dutch edition cover of Umberto Eco's Baudolino (which deals in part with Frederick Barbarossa). Not sure about different language editions.

Kor | The Age of Chivalry is upon us!
Wellent ich gugk, so hindert mich / köstlicher ziere sinder,
Der ich e pflag, da für ich sich / Neur kelber, gaiss, böck, rinder,
Und knospot leut, swarz, hässeleich, / Vast rüssig gen dem winder;
Die geben müt als sackwein vich. / Vor angst slach ich mein kinder
Offt hin hinder.
Enkidu of Uruk
Legionary
(id: thekid951)
posted 16 September 2009 08:10 EDT (US)     182 / 188       
"The development and perfection of the Roman Legion" will be the subject of my coursework , a six-month study and research which will end with a 30 page essay and presentation.

But is there a lot of information on this subject? How much is known about the Roman armies and the evolution in it?
If I'm not mistaking, there's pretty much info on the subject and I shouldn't worry. Still, I ask you. Thanks

edit: Also, my three research questions would be :

1) How did the Roman military come to be the most effective military force in Europe?

2) How did the Roman Empire control conquered territories and integrate them into their Empire?

3) What caused the decline and eventual failure of the Roman military to defend the Empire?

Do these make sense?

[This message has been edited by TheKid951 (edited 09-16-2009 @ 08:21 AM).]

Terikel Grayhair
Imperator
(id: Terikel706)
posted 16 September 2009 08:37 EDT (US)     183 / 188       
They make sense, but they can also have incredibly long and arduous explanations.

How did the Roman military become so effective: trial and error, weapons suited to tactics and tactics to weapons, and logistics- a lot of logistics.

The second question contains more political answers than military ones. Romanization was a process, and took a long time. Political and religious measures were more an influence than military.

The third will be the hardest- it combines military and technological advance with political instability, new forms of warfare, population pressure outside the empire versus decline of soldier quality and quantity inside, economic factors, and an overall feeling of apathy that was permeating the Empire in its final years.

People write books covering any one of these questions- and you will be trying to answer all three thoroughly.

Good luck!

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Enkidu of Uruk
Legionary
(id: thekid951)
posted 16 September 2009 10:38 EDT (US)     184 / 188       
Thanks. Do you think the research questions could be improven, like the second one? In fact, all three of them were just suggestions from someone else on a forum, and I'm not completely convinced wether they are good enough or not.

The first question, "How did the Roman military come to be the most effective military force in Europe?" is good, I think. However, I think I might adjust the second one, because, as you said, it's rather political than militarily. The third one seems reasonable aswell.

I'll be reading a lot of books, so I'm heading to the library now.

Terikel Grayhair
Imperator
(id: Terikel706)
posted 16 September 2009 11:16 EDT (US)     185 / 188       
I'd just drop the whole Romanization question completely, and stick to the military.

After discussing the evolution and rise of the legionary and his weapons, you could try this as a second question:

How did the Romans sustain this military from Augustus to the Decline of Rome?

This includes the evolution of the legions into limitani and palatine legions, the growing importance of mobility, an the entire logistics chain from producer of food to consumer (the legionary), and all the noncombatants needed to make a legion function.
Legio Yow
Legionary
posted 16 September 2009 14:57 EDT (US)     186 / 188       
There is a pretty good amount of information on the development of Roman arms. You will have to use lots of extrapolation for the beginning, but books have been filled with discussions of Roman military evolution.

"That which we call a nose can still smell!"
-Reduced Shakespeare Company

"Abroad, French transit workers attempt to end a strike, only to discover that they have forgotten how to operate the trains. Everybody enjoys a hearty laugh and returns to the café." -Dave Barry
GabrielBrasil
Legionary
posted 11 September 2010 09:33 EDT (US)     187 / 188       
I have a question:

Who exactly was Skanderbeg?I heard about him once but I didn't found much.

"Quem perdoa é Deus.Nós estamos aqui para adiantar o encontro com Ele."
BOPE Commander when asked what they would do with the Drug Dealers.
Gnarlyhotep
Legionary
posted 13 September 2010 15:06 EDT (US)     188 / 188       
Wasn't he the Albanian who lead a resistence to the Ottoman expansion in the balkan area during the 15th century? I believe he had such success that it delayed Ottoman goals long enough to allow the Austrians and Italian states to shore up defenses and organize enough to avoid being swept under the (until then) rapid advance.
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