You must be logged in to post messages.
Please login or register

Rome Strategy Discussion
Moderated by Terikel Grayhair, General Sajaru, Awesome Eagle

Hop to:    
Welcome! You are not logged in. Please Login or Register.3 replies
Total War Heaven » Forums » Rome Strategy Discussion » To mine or not to mine, to draft or not to draft, those are the questions
Bottom
Topic Subject:To mine or not to mine, to draft or not to draft, those are the questions
brianiangoodman
Legionary
posted 27 December 2011 23:32 EDT (US)         
I have some questions about overall campaign play.

First, whenever I see a territory withing mining capability, I always go after them first, seeing them as good addition profit. The question is: Is this an effective strategy.

Second, I after playing the game for almost 3 quarters of a year now, I still have trouble with money vs. troops equation. In an early campaign, I quickly learned that if you try to draft a big army before you economy is ready for that burden, it will send you into the negative amounts. The problem I have is that many times when I see one of my cities going negative which means to me not that they are losing money, but the city's expenses or more than its income, and thus the remainder is being drained from my treasury. Therefore, whenever I see the income from one of my cities getting low or even seeing that one of my cities is draining my treasury, I feel very hesitant to recruit more troops.

The following scenario happened to me many times. This time, I was playing the Julii, and had Segeste, Arretium, Arrinium and Selona (which I took for its mining capability.) I left a small army in Selona in case the Macedonian's or the Dacians came knocking and brought the rest of my army back to Italy to join the army I was drafting in preparation for a two-pronged attack on Po River Gauls. However, after defeating a band of rebels in my territories, I noticed that Arrinium's income was getting low, and if I didn't do anyhting about, Arrinium would start draining funds from my treasury. So I stopped all military unit production except for those already being recruited. In the meantime I recruited just peasants from my two larger towns to bolster the populations in Segeste and Selona in order to get them to the Large Town level. All available projects in those towns had been completed, so they were just waiting to expand. My hope was that they expansion of these towns would help relieve some of the expense burden being placed on Arrinium and brings it's income back up. This took several turns to happen, and eventually it seemed as if I was able to at least recruit a few military units if any. This whole time my main army was sitting in a fort just outside the Gallic border in the pass between the Italian heartland and the Po river. However, at this time I discovered the worse has happened.

Gaul had already declared war on me, a report that I must have missed. Two medium size Gallic armies was already marching towards Arrinium. While I marched out my fortified army to intercept them, I had my spy (which was at the Po River to begin with to keep any eye Gallic movements) explore those Gallic lands to see if there where any weaknesses. I expected that the two Gallic armies near me was all there was in the Po River valley, and that other Gallic armies were too far away to help. I expected that once my army finished off the attacking armies, they could easily take both cities without much reinforcements from other Gallic cities for a while. I was sorely mistaken.

My spy discovered three similar sized armies patrolling about the valley on the north side of the river. At the same time, two more armies were marching through the passes to the west and northwest. With only one moderate sized army and no economic capacity to recruit more armies, I felt defeated, and quit the game. It seems to me that this whole incident occurred because I was spent all my focus worrying about the stability of my treasury, and I was not prepared for war when it showed up on my doorstep. This has happened too many times. The fact is, I worry every single moment about my treasury going under and not being able to recover from it.


So the question is tri-fold: First, what is the true dividing line between having enough money to afford the armies you want or not having enough money, and what information that the game provides can tell me this. Second, Do I have to fear going under that much. If my treasury going into the negative, can I recover. Finally, is there a possiblity that I can train an army that puts my treasury into the negative just to recover when I've taken new territories.

This is all very confusing and it has been a constant contention point for me.

Golden Rules of Compainging:
1. It's the Economy
2. Controlled Expansion
3. Keeping Momentum
AuthorReplies:
Terikel Grayhair
Imperator
(id: Terikel706)
posted 28 December 2011 02:14 EDT (US)     1 / 3       
To understand economy better, this scroll should explain things quite thoroughly.

You might also want to take a peek at this scroll as well.

Summed up, the income displayed for a city is the sum of its actual income minus its portion of your realm's costs. Cities never lose money, though they may be taxed beyond their income.

To answer your questions directly:
First, what is the true dividing line between having enough money to afford the armies you want or not having enough money, and what information that the game provides can tell me this.
There is none. All is relative. Cities never cost your realm money- they generate it. Set taxes as high as possible and build roads, ports, traders.
Second, Do I have to fear going under that much. If my treasury going into the negative, can I recover.
No. And Yes. Go forth and conquer. The more cities you have, the more income to support your warhost.
Finally, is there a possiblity that I can train an army that puts my treasury into the negative just to recover when I've taken new territories.
Of course. Go forth and conquer. Concentrate your efforts on where the money is- go for Greece, the Nile, teh Levant, Spain. Avoid the piss-poor barbarian territories to the north- they have lots of land but no gold. Britannia is okay- rich if you build up the ports. Londinium-Samrobriva is a trade route worth a lot. Other than that, there is little to the north.

|||||||||||||||| A transplanted Viking, born a millennium too late. |||||||||||||||||
|||||||||||||||| Too many Awards to list in Signature, sorry lords...|||||||||||||||||
|||||||||||||||| Listed on my page for your convenience and envy.|||||||||||||||||
Somewhere over the EXCO Rainbow
Master Skald, Order of the Silver Quill, Guild of the Skalds
Champion of the Sepia Joust- Joust I, II, IV, VI, VII, VIII

[This message has been edited by Terikel Grayhair (edited 12-28-2011 @ 02:15 AM).]

Punic Hebil
Centurion
(id: Punic Hoplite)
posted 28 December 2011 11:34 EDT (US)     2 / 3       
The line between having money to spend on armies and losing some treasury can be found when you press your faction symbol button in the right hand corner of your screen on the campaign map. The screen that says how many battles you've won and lose will pop up (it says more, but I think most people know what I'm talking about). There should be three (four if playing as the Romans) tabs, saying Diplomacy, Financial, and Faction. Click the Financial, and towards the bottom there will be a thing saying "Projected Profits". If that is red, you will lose some money next turn as your expenses exceeded your income.


Yes, you can always recover from going in the hole financially. I've done migration campaigns where I arrive in Britannia with -150,000 denarii. Just gotta use your armies very, very wisely when you get in debt that far :P

And Terikel has the best answer for the third question.

I am the Carthaginian who became an angel, and surrendered his wings for a life on the sea of battle.

My magic screen is constantly bombarded with nubile young things eager to please these old eyes. This truly is a wonderful period in which to exist! - Terikel the Deflowerer
Thompsoncs
Legionary
posted 28 December 2011 14:55 EDT (US)     3 / 3       
I find it extremely easy to have money in rome total war, medieval 2 is another story though, I usually find myself going to fast for my economy there.

A few things that work for me.

1 You'll need starting armies capable of capturing cities, but don't overdo it. Once you capture some cities you can expand your army.

2 Go for large cities and exterminate: Less problems with happiness and a large amount of money to keep you going for a few turns. Especially greece and italy are good targets with lots of fairly rich cities. Capture all of greece and your economy should be safe.

3 Mining doe have it's profits, but in the end it's usually trade that brings in the big money (I don't build too much farms ands markets, because they increase population, giving happiness problems in late game). Bigger docks can trade with up to 3 cities, so having a few coastal areas will increase your income for sure, and docks are much cheaper than mines.
You must be logged in to post messages.
Please login or register

Hop to:    

Total War Heaven | HeavenGames